• Economy

    We look at the commercial economy as a subset of the entire wealth creation process and differentiate between the commercial economy and human well-being. more >

  • Environment

    We make the case for the necessity of a healthy environment, illustrate the decline of various elements of the environment and discuss the consequences and possible forecasts of environmental decline more >

  • Population

    Aspects of the population issue. We look at aging vs the real trend of demographic transition. We look at the population as not just a measure of the size of the market but as individuals living in a complex and interdependent world. Like consumption, population growth forever is illustrated as impossible and suicidal. We illustrate the human population cycles of the past and try and pinpoint our place on the current cycle. more >

  • Social Welfare

    Social welfare is the ability of a society to offer all of its citizens social services and a stable income that is sufficient enough to provide an adequate level of well-being. The level of social welfare and equality will be reflected in the levels of health and happiness of its citizens. We present many aspects of these issues and promote more comprehensive methods of well-being. more >

Towards a
Sustainable Society 

 

Please join our efforts to make Canada a social and environmental leader.   

Canada is continuing to pursue a course of non-stop growth through reckless resource exploitation, rapid population growth and increasing consumption.  These actions are done in the name of growing the economy.   The real world results of this antiquated mandate are rising carbon emissions, increasing public and private debt, loss of prime farmland plus growing debt and inequality. 

The size of the commercial economy has been placed ahead of the common good.  This approach is not sustainable environmentally, socially or fiscally either nationally or globally.  Infinite

growth is impossible on a finite planet.

What is the sustainable alternative?  

  • A much broader based economy 
  • A large number of stable green energy jobs spread throughout local communities
  • Much lower levels of pollution
  • Higher quality of life

Our national policy focus should be on developing human potential and maintaining our environmental assets rather than using our people as consumers and cheap labour to exhaust our resources as quickly as possible. 

The fast growing Canadian economy has produced:

  • The worst record of any industrialized nation for urbanization of farmland and carbon emissions growth  
  • Growth of inequality and debt
  • Decline of the middle class
  • high youth unemployment

The quality and variety of productive jobs is much larger in a broad-based, sustainable economy. Growth-at-any-cost comes with booms and busts while a sustainable economy offers high quality, stable jobs in the long term. 

Canada needs to change its focus from the pursuit of continued growth to investing in our people.  We need to produce a more equal society with declining numbers of working poor and a more extensive social safety net underwritten by fiscal balance.  We need to be clear that the welfare of our citizens and the health of our environment, rather than the size of the commercial economy, are what constitute the common good.


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Articles

  • Corporate Accountability on Sustainability

    The corporate business model for International trade, as it is now, is not sustainable nor respectful of human dignity and environmental sustainability.  

    As John Erik Meyer of “The Social Contract” and “The Perfect Currency”, states “Free Trade and Globalization are centred on the concept of maximizing consumption. They strive to narrow the base of national economies to the few sectors in which they are most competitive internationally. Although consumption and international trade are both maximized under the current approach, globalization increases social and economic instability along with international interdependence.”

  • True Cost & Hidden Source of Urban Sprawl

    Did you know?

    1. Less than ½ of 1% of Canada’s land is Class 1 farmland and more than half of this is in Ontario.
    2. Between 1996 and 2006 Ontario lost 600,000 acres of farmland (165 acres a day), which included 18% of Ontario’s class 1 farmland.
    3. Farming and food processing employs 700,000 people in Ontario.

    4. Income Polarization Affects Us All

      Income polarization is when a nation has a large gap between its highest earners and its lowest earners, with only a small number of mid-level earners in between.

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